Solar eclipse visible in Wakefield

The past week has been exciting for anyone interested in the Sun. Last week, on Friday, I photographed the Sun and captured a picture of a large group of sunspots. One day later, a coronal mass ejection (CME) – a huge explosion – associated with the spots sent millions of tonnes of material towards Earth. On Monday, this material hit the Earth’s atmosphere, causing widespread displays of the Aurora Borealis and turning the night sky green on St Patrick’s Day in some places.

Then, four days after the “St Patrick’s Day storm”, the moon moved across the face of the sun to create a partial eclipse earlier today. The cloud was a bit of a nuisance but it didn’t spoil the day. On the pictures, you can see a sunspot in the top left quarter of the disk.

Solar eclipse

Solar eclipse

Solar eclipse

Solar eclipse

Solar eclipse

sun spots

sun spots

Solar eclipse

Solar eclipse

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