Moth-Trapping in Hemsworth

In Hemsworth, the moth trap has been attracting some familiar species recently. In the following picture, clockwise from top left, there are maple button (Acleris forsskaliana), shaded broad-bar (Scotopteryx chenopodiata), peppered moth (Biston betularia) and scalloped oak (Crocallis elinguaria).

Moths trapped recently

Moths trapped recently

When using a moth-trap, it’s always a good idea to check the outside of the box and any nearby objects as moths often settle there. This swallow-tailed moth was resting on the step below the trap.

Swallow-tailed moth

Swallow-tailed moth

The swallow-tailed moth is a large, attractive species which often comes to the trap. When you first start using a moth trap, it is a surprise to find how many species visit an ordinary garden regularly. A favourite of mine is the common footman.

Common footman (Eilema lurideola)

Common footman (Eilema lurideola)

The small “micro-moths” can be hard to identify but it is worth having a close look at them because of the range of colours and shapes. This diamond-back moth is also a common species. Its other name is cabbage moths and this moth may well be one of the culprits behind the damage to young cabbages in my garden.

The micro-moth Diamond-back moth (Plutella xylostella)

The micro-moth Diamond-back moth (Plutella xylostella)